Christmas and Old Folks

5 Dec

 

133

 This is a West Virginia scene. No snow in Central Florida!

For us older parishioners, Christmas brings back many memories of the “good old days.” I remember my earliest Christmases—the mystery of Santa Claus and the anticipation of what would suddenly appear under the tree.

I remember loving and generous parents, although they were far from rich and not especially comfortable with expenses vs. income. And I had wonderful grandparents, uncles and aunts, and cousins galore. Then there was brother, nine years my senior—and the wicked joy he took in teasing me.

Memories of Joy and Sadness

But burned ever more deeply in my memory was the tradition of Midnight Mass for all of us, with Mama singing alto in our parish choir.

Even when I was five or six years old, I knew the real meaning of Christmas—Jesus, our Savior is born.

Christmas joy and love remain among us—but, along with other older Catholics, there is that sadness that “things are no longer the same.” We are not as spry as we used to be. We forget things that happened last night while we recall a Christmas decades ago.

And there is sadness, too, that “things are no longer the same” in our families. There are fewer families boasting relatives who live near us, who can come together for Christmas dinner.

And, many of us old folks experience disappointment that, in our judgment, some of our children, grandchildren and other relatives seem to have lost the significance of the birth of Christ.

Incarnation is for Every Day

The Incarnation of the Son of God, and his birth from the virginal womb of Mary, must remain a daily reality. You see, we are part of the mystery of Incarnation. The Son of God became a man like us in all things except sin. We are in Christ; we are the Body of Christ.

In baptism, we were filled with divine life of God—and Jesus’s mission became our own when he commanded: “Go forth and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit” (Mt 28:19 ff).

Live What We Believe

We have no idea how our faith will impress or inspire those around us. Blessed Pope Paul VI said that we first of all share our faith by our goodness and holiness. In other words, we live and practice what we believe before we can ever hope to convince others when we speak to them about our faith.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: